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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
this in washington. as the legendary everett dirksen once said, a billion here a billion there, pretty soon you're talking real money, about you this debate isn't just about the billions here and there. for average families the payroll tax cut that started two years ago is worth around 1000 as year. those families tend to spend that cash because they need it now. republicans say this is one tax cut they hate and the last time it was going to expire, the white house launched a whole campaign about $40 a paycheck. they asked families to send in their stories about what $40 meant to them. well, you know something? $40 a still a lot of cash for the families hit hardest by the great recession. for the wealthy people sitting around the negotiating table in d.c., $40 is just another steak dinner for one. but for many people who voted them into office, it's the cost of groceries for a week of family dinners. let's not forget, they are the ones who still need an economic stimulus, not the families earning more than $250,000 a year. joining me today on a newsy day, "the huffington post" sam stein and the
falls in a barrel. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let's start with this. president obama and his republican opponents are about to go over niagra falls in a barrel, but nobody knows for shush how bad it's going to be. will the economy smash on the rocks below? will the stock market plunge a thousand points and keep on dropping? will the world money watchers see the u.s. drowning in its own dysfunction? or will obama and the dead-end opposition it faces be saved by the public's horribly low expectations of what they can do? what will prove stronger for obama and boehner? the barrels they're riding in or the power of niagra falls itself? joining me now is politico's jonathan ryan. how about an answer on that one? what's going to protect these guys more? the low expectations people have about them getting anything done or failing to do what they set out to do. they all set the deadline. they have the -- what do you call it. the stakes are clear, the payroll taxes, income taxes, you name it. they put it all together. and if they blow it, who
. >>> the bands of marriage. let's play "hardball." good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start with this. are we living in a liberal hour? four states voted against or actually voted last month either for gay marriage equality or against efforts to deny it. the issue that just eight years ago was used to deny victory to a democratic presidential candidate, john kerry, is now this country's majority opinion. well, something here has stirred but what is it in what has shifted the grunt tw-thirds against smement marriage to more than 50% for it in compassion, common sense, idea fatigue? the inability of opponents to specify a single argument against it or is it the sheer number of declarations to family, friends, co-workers and public by so many people that they are gay? is this why owe so many americans have changed their mind on marriage equality? in any case tonight a major break through in the conservative ranks. our guest clark cooper, president of the log cabin republicans, and joan walsh of salon.com. let's take a look at something that george will said this weekend and the
appreciate your time. robert costa is the washington editor for national review and a contributor to cnbc's kudlow report and msnbc political analyst david corn is the washington bureau chief for mother jones magazine. bob, you really had the backstory on what went on last night. i'm surprised to hear the congressman say it wasn't just the most conservative members of the republican house. does that comport with your understanding? >> sure. there are a few moderates who were against -- >> a few. >> a few, but this was really driven by the conservatives in the house who went to john boehner at 7:00 last night and they say we cannot support this at all. remember, there are 241 republicans in the house. boehner could risk having 24 defections. i hear the number was between 30, 50, maybe even 60 defectors. boehner pulled the entire thing from the floor, went ahead of the conference, said a prayer about serenity, and pulled the entire thing from the floor and sent everybody home. >> what was the basic objection. the congressman just said it wasn't a perception they would be participating in a
the sequester, this term we've been throwing around washington now for about a year and a half. it was the result of that debt budget deal, that ceiling rise in july of 2011. they said if there was no deal to significantly reduce government spending by this time, midnight tonight, then there would be this draconian and indiscriminate cut across the board, 50% of it, $500 billion over ten years in defense, $500 billion over ten years in other social spending, including social safety net programs. everyone was going to feel a little pain. the trouble is now some elements, particularly in the senate, are trying to delay that, put that off, one month, two months, three months, even a year by some estimations, and a lot of folks, particularly republicans in the house, say no way, we're not going for that. we're getting nothing out of this in terms of spending cuts except the sequestration. a lot of ironies here. it was house republicans who literally blamed the president for coming up with the sequestration idea to begin with. they've spent months blaming him. what you saw mitch mcc
in washington. tonight we have an hour to get on top of this horrific tragedy in connecticut, to get our heads around it, to understand why it happened, how things like this happen. we'll take, of course, much longer. but let's get to it. we have chris jansing on the scene in newtown, connecticut. nbc justice correspondent pete williams in washington. we have clint van zandt, former fbi profiler and nbc analyst with me in the studio. nbc white house correspondent kris welker is with us. we also have larry johnson, the president of the national association of school safety and law enforcement officials. first we go for an immediate update to my msnbc colleague chris jansing. chris, i know you have aride on the site in newtown, connecticut. what's the latest? >> reporter: well, there was just a briefing by officials here, and it is obviously the most devastating of news. as they describe it, this has been a scene of absolute horror. in fact, they have moved the press away from the school here to a community area, and the parents are still gathering at the nearby fire station. the problem is the
in washington. let me start tonight with some grave robbing. we're going gown to the dark, cold tomb of the late romney campaign. we're going to excavate the murky truths that were the living heart and mind of the defeated republican effort. going to exhume tonight the guts of the thinking that went on and went so wrong. tonight, we get what we only guessed at, the results of which played out in the numbers of election night. the nasty, anti-immigrant politics, the attitude toward that 47%, the failure to turn out the white male vote, the reason romney picked ryan and the wild prelude to the clipt eastwood performance. tonight on "hardball," the dark arona of what lies now beneath the dirt so we can understand what it looks like, to think and feel your way into a historic disaster. with me are jeff zeleny with "the new york times" and susan milligan who is contributing editor at ""u.s. news & world report."" you laugh, it's not funny. you both attended that harvard institute of policy forum. they just released, we have the audio recordings of that not filmed event. we have a real autopsy of what
corn is the washington bureau chief for "mother jones" magazine. mr. siebold, are you comfortable with what the nra put forward today? >> well, absolutely. i mean, this is the only answer. that more guns equals less crime. i mean, if we don't arm the teachers, if we don't have guards at the schools, this is going to happen again. there's no question about it, whether we do this or not. but at least the teachers have a fighting chance. at least they have a fighting chance to save those little kids. >> do i understand your view to be that it would be a requirement for teachers? what if i'm a teacher who doesn't want to carry a firearm? i'm not proficient and i want nothing to do with guns. >> i don't want my kid in your class, then. because my kid is in danger -- >> wow? real? >> i'll send my kid to another school. >> so to a young person today who's pursuing a career in education, they would also need to be trained and comfortedble with the idea of carrying a weapon? >> unfortunately, this is the world we live in. >> by that logic -- one last thing, david. by that logic, why not ar
's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start with this. today the united states supreme court said it would take up the issue of same-sex marriage. this is an astounding moment in american history and in the march of rights that began in philadelphia in the last quarter of the 18th century and continues through this first quarter of the 21st. is it constitutional for a state to deny people of the same sex the right to marry under the law? well, let's consider the 14th amendment. nor shall any state deprive any person of life, liberty, or property without due process of law nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protections of the laws. and here is justice kennedy, anthony kennedy, in his majority opinion in the lawrence case of 2003 which declared anti-sodomy laws unconstitutional. quote, does a statute making it a crime for two persons of the same sex to engage in certain intimate sexual conduct violate the due process clause? yes. a statute making it a crime for two persons of the same sex to engage in certain intimate sexual
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)